Tag Archives: Fred Khumalo

A literary weekend in Prince Albert

By the time we arrived in Prince Albert, Helen Moffett and I knew we would be publishing a book together. Put two writers in a car, let them travel for four hours through an inspiring landscape, and that is what happens. We drove into the town as the sky burst into crimson flames of sunset. I have never visited before, but when the Leesfees offered us slots on their beautifully curated programme, I jumped at the opportunity to experience the festival that I had been hearing wonderful things about for years.

I have said it before and I will repeat it many times: for readers literary festivals are fantastic opportunities for discovering new authors and interacting with the ones they love; for writers these events offer the possibility of engaging with their fans and introducing their work to new audiences, of course – it is a two-way process after all (a shout out to Ingrid Wolfaardt, Henry Welman and Azille Coetzee – it was lovely to meet you in person!). But for authors festivals are also great for socialising with colleagues: one feels less alone, more inspired, and often such events are the beginning of extraordinary literary projects and journeys. As a publisher now, every time I travel with Karavan Press authors, I get to know them and their craft a little bit more and my gratitude towards them deepens along the way.

Dawn Garisch, Melissa A. Volker and her husband Rick (no doubt Melissa’s greatest fan – he spoke about seeing someone read A Fractured Land at the Lazy Lizard festival café with the same enthusiasm as about the Springbok win!) booked us a table at The Olive Branch that first evening. The food was so delicious and the entire staff so friendly that Helen was ready to propose marriage to the talented chef.

The next day for breakfast, we ended up at the Lazy Lizard headquarters and accidentally bumped into Sally Andrew of Tannie Maria fame. She promptly offered to read us a passage from her latest novel, which features the Lazy Lizard and its famous Full Monty Breakfast as well as the even more famous Apple Pie. Helen and I tucked in while Sally read to us: a surreal literary experience if there ever was one.

Our blood was green and gold that day, but Sally and Fred Khumalo dutifully went off to entertain their Leesfees audiences while I marched off to find the nearest gin bar and cheered and cried with the rest of the crowd gathered there. Oh Captain, our Captain!

High on emotions, I had the enormous pleasure of interviewing Dawn and Melissa about “seeing things differently” next. This was the theme of the festival and these two incredibly talented authors allowed us a glimpse into their imaginations and their literary lives as they aim to entertain their readers while remaining true to their principles of caring about others and the planet we all share.

The next day, I also had the opportunity to talk about environmental themes and the reality of our extremely wasteful and destructive ways with Helen. What I love about her approach to these highly topical concerns is her can-do attitude. Helen does not make her readers despair, she empowers us and encourages to do things differently, with more care and compassion. A true inspiration. And she is so funny, too!

No wonder all her books were sold out within minutes after the talk. The booksellers at the festival, Rosemary and Carmen of Bargain Books George, did a stellar job at getting our books to Prince Albert, but even they could not predict how popular Helen’s little books of environmental wisdom would turn out to be.

Whenever I present at a festival myself or interview authors, I always try to attend other events as a reader. In the morning of the first day, Dawn and I went to listen to Joanne Jowell and Miché Solomon speak to Vanessa Botha about Miché’s remarkable story as told to Joanne in Zephany: Two Mothers, One Daughter. And in the evening, we listened to Helen, Annette Snyckers and Archie Swanson read their poetry. It was the perfect way to end the day. Beauty and calm descended as the poets treated us to a literary feast.

I also attended Jan van Tonder’s talk at the festival. He was interviewed by Pieter Hugo. I love listening to Afrikaans and this was my way of indulging in the language a little bit again. What made the occasion truly special were the accompanying memories. When I first visited André in Cape Town in May 2005, on the day after my arrival he drove me to Oudtshoorn to introduce me to his dear friends, Marina and Gerrit. I met Jan during the visit, too. Two years later, in 2007, we all gathered in Stilbaai and watched the Rugby World Cup final together. Jan reminded me of the occasion when we spoke after the talk and said: “When I saw you in André’s Springbok shirt earlier in the day, I thought it a good omen for the final.” Indeed, both times Jan and I were in the same place for the final, the Boks won. I think we should plan something for 2023 together!

I can’t wait until Jan’s latest novel is translated into English. It sounded like something I would love to read. I will never forget his Roepman / Stargazer.

There was time to relax and to celebrate. Prince Albert welcomed us all with open arms. The organisers of the festival deserve medals for all their fantastic work. Thank you to Linda Jaquet and the Leesfees team! Our hosts were kind in providing us with the most beautiful places to stay. The audiences were attentive and generous. I already promised myself that I will be there for the next Leesfees in whatever capacity: as publisher, writer, interviewer or reader. And next time, on the way there or back, Helen and I are planning a longer visit at Matjiesfontein. There was only time for lunch and the celebratory springbok burger on this trip.

When we visit again, Helen promised to play the piano in the bar of the Lord Milner Hotel! And we might have a book to launch…

 

Review: Talk of the Town by Fred Khumalo

Talk-of-the-Town“Now, there are storytellers, and there are Storytellers”, the narrator of Water No Get Enemy, one of Fred Khumalo’s stories collected in Talk of the Town, tells us about Guz-Magesh, a larger than life character who features in two of the pieces: “His well of tales is bottomless.” He has that in common with his creator. Khumalo is the author of four novels. His short stories have been considered for prestigious awards and featured in several magazines and anthologies. Talk of the Town is his debut collection.

The titular story of the volume is told from the perspective of a child who witnesses how his enterprising and hard-working mother sets their family apart by not having the furniture she buys repossessed by creditors. When her luck changes, the mother relies on her unsuspecting children to protect her from the fate of most of their neighbours.

Khumalo’s range of settings and characters is versatile. He moves between the apartheid past to the present, and between several countries. Water Get No Enemy and The Invisibles are set in present-day Yeoville, but the former moves back in time to the Liberation Army camps in Angola.

The stories of This Bus Is Not Full! and Learning to Love take place in the US, where two South African men end up living, but not entirely fitting in. The longest story in the collection is set in neighbouring Zimbabwe and has the feel of an abandoned novel in the making.

Reading Khumalo’s stories, one’s imagination and sense of political correctness can be both challenged to their limits, and it is to his credit that he can make us curious and care about even the least likable characters. At the same time, his stories can be poignant and excruciatingly funny. That is what keeps one returning for more.

Talk of the Town

by Fred Khumalo

Kwela, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 19 July 2019.