Woman Zone Book Club Guest Author

On Saturday, 14 December 2019, I have been invited to speak about my work at the Woman Zone Book Club in Cape Town.

Woman Zone

The Woman Zone Book Club is a lively afternoon of discussion, debate and discovery, sharing books from our shelves and welcoming local guest authors. Everyone is welcome at any meeting.

How it works: We review the books borrowed last month and, over a cup of tea or coffee, we chat about great reads and meet our guest author.

Even if you haven’t been before you can tell us what’s on your bedside table.
Then we browse the shelves of the Woman’s Library and choose an enticing title to borrow for the next month

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Date: Saturday 14 December
From: 2pm to 4pm

Woman Zone Library Hub, Ground Floor, Artscape
RSVP: 

Beryl 082 490 6652 hipzone@mweb.co.za
or Nancy 083 431 9986 info@womanzonect.co.za

Donation: R30
Tea and coffee served

Check out reviews on
Instagram: wzbookclub and
facebook.com/Woman Zone CT

Review: Cape Town – A Place Between by Henry Trotter

Capet Town_A Place BetweenThe first in the Intimate Geographies series, Cape Town: A Place Between by Henry Trotter is a thought-provoking, genre-crossing book that will intrigue locals and foreigners alike. Incorporating elements of memoir, guide book, socio-political history and travelogue, Trotter tells a compelling story and captures the essence of what makes the Mother City so irresistible on the one hand, and so impossible to grasp on the other.

He opens with three vignettes from the recent past: Day Zero, a bizarre hijacking attempt and the Clifton Fourth Beach sheep slaughter. From there, he sets out to deepen our understanding of these snapshots by exploring the different strands of history that made them possible and covers impressive ground in short, entertaining chapters that will make you look at Cape Town anew, even if you have lived here all your life. As a visitor you couldn’t ask for a more succinct and vivid introduction to the place.

Trotter is American, an outsider who made Cape Town his home many years ago. His perspective is fascinating, but it is, of course, not without its challenges: “I realize”, he writes, “there’s nothing quite like listening to a white American guy man-splaining African history and culture. Even I cringe when I think about that.” But there is much more to Trotter than meets the eye, and it is precisely because he is painstakingly aware of his position that Cape Town: A Place Between becomes such a ground-breaking book.

The title of the series is crucial to remember: this is an “intimate” take on a geographical place many of us who live here believe we know; no matter how frustrated we get trying to come to terms with its many contradictions. Trotter invites us to “embrace the discomfort, the dissonance, and the delight entailed in investigating this inimitable city called Cape Town.”

Cape Town: A Place Between

Henry Trotter

Catalyst Press, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 29 November 2019.

 

Review: Made in Sweden – 25 Ideas that Created a Country by Elisabeth Åsbrink

Made in SwedenWhether it is ABBA, Pippi Longstocking, Scandi noir, Swedish massage, Volvo or IKEA furniture, these famous Swedish exports usually evoke positive connotations. We often associate Scandinavian countries in general and Sweden in particular with innovative ideas and socio-political stability. Award-winning Swedish author, Elisabeth Åsbrink, decided to test these assumptions about her country and ask herself the following questions: What are the real Swedish values? Who is the real Swedish model?

In her latest book translated into English, Made in Sweden: 25 Ideas that Created a Country, Åsbrink, who recently visited South Africa for the Open Book Festival, looks into some of the most defining concepts and figures shaping her home country and debunks some of the myths which have grown around them. The book is a fascinating journey through Scandinavia’s ancient and more recent history as well as a key guide to understanding present-day Sweden and its people.

Åsbrink’s love for her country is clear, however it “isn’t blind.” Many of her revelations are surprising, if not shocking: a few will make you rethink your love of Swedish things (like the history of IKEA and its founder’s dubious past). Others will make you want to embrace them with joy. The story that moved me the most is the one about how, exactly forty years ago, Sweden became the first country to ban all forms of psychological and physical violence towards children and how Astrid Lindgren was involved in making it happen.

Made in Sweden: 25 Ideas that Created a Country

Elisabeth Åsbrink

Scribe, 2019

First published in the Cape Times on 22 November 2019.

HAIR: Weaving and Unpicking Stories of Identity – first reviews

HAIRcover_10cmHigh_rgb“There is nothing boring about this anthology!” writes Consuelo Roland (author of The Good Cemetery Guide, Lady Limbo and Wolf Trap) on Goodreads, and continues: “Many of the stories are partially embedded in time and space against the background of South Africa’s apartheid legacy, but there is also spontaneity, humour and mystery, and a sense of how one might wriggle out from under the weight of our hair (the burdens of past and present). As the first brilliant story ‘The Collection’ by Alex Latimer reminds us hair is something dead and yet it makes us alive and present. Other stories that stayed with me (yours may well be different, this collection is that good!): ‘Before We Go’, ‘Spa Ritual’, ‘The Wisdom of Sunday’, ‘A Woman’s Glory’, ‘At Length, Hair’s Breath,’, ‘That Famous Winter Brown’, ‘Let The Music Play On’, ‘Reunion’. And then there’s the soulful, beautifully written (not an unnecessary word) ‘Lila’, by Bongani Kona, that felt like someone had thrown a brick at my chest so that I could hardly breathe with the sadness of it…”

To read the entire review, please click here: Goodreads

HAIR_Country Life

The collection has also been chosen by Nancy Richards as one of “ten top local titles” for “holiday reading” in the December issue of Country Life. The magazine is running a competition in which you can win a copy of HAIR among a few other fabulous local titles. Click here for details: Win this Holiday Reading Books Hamper.

We-have-some-great-books-up-for-grabs-in-our-holiday-reading-books-competition

Photo: Country Life

A literary weekend in Prince Albert

By the time we arrived in Prince Albert, Helen Moffett and I knew we would be publishing a book together. Put two writers in a car, let them travel for four hours through an inspiring landscape, and that is what happens. We drove into the town as the sky burst into crimson flames of sunset. I have never visited before, but when the Leesfees offered us slots on their beautifully curated programme, I jumped at the opportunity to experience the festival that I had been hearing wonderful things about for years.

I have said it before and I will repeat it many times: for readers literary festivals are fantastic opportunities for discovering new authors and interacting with the ones they love; for writers these events offer the possibility of engaging with their fans and introducing their work to new audiences, of course – it is a two-way process after all (a shout out to Ingrid Wolfaardt, Henry Welman and Azille Coetzee – it was lovely to meet you in person!). But for authors festivals are also great for socialising with colleagues: one feels less alone, more inspired, and often such events are the beginning of extraordinary literary projects and journeys. As a publisher now, every time I travel with Karavan Press authors, I get to know them and their craft a little bit more and my gratitude towards them deepens along the way.

Dawn Garisch, Melissa A. Volker and her husband Rick (no doubt Melissa’s greatest fan – he spoke about seeing someone read A Fractured Land at the Lazy Lizard festival café with the same enthusiasm as about the Springbok win!) booked us a table at The Olive Branch that first evening. The food was so delicious and the entire staff so friendly that Helen was ready to propose marriage to the talented chef.

The next day for breakfast, we ended up at the Lazy Lizard headquarters and accidentally bumped into Sally Andrew of Tannie Maria fame. She promptly offered to read us a passage from her latest novel, which features the Lazy Lizard and its famous Full Monty Breakfast as well as the even more famous Apple Pie. Helen and I tucked in while Sally read to us: a surreal literary experience if there ever was one.

Our blood was green and gold that day, but Sally and Fred Khumalo dutifully went off to entertain their Leesfees audiences while I marched off to find the nearest gin bar and cheered and cried with the rest of the crowd gathered there. Oh Captain, our Captain!

High on emotions, I had the enormous pleasure of interviewing Dawn and Melissa about “seeing things differently” next. This was the theme of the festival and these two incredibly talented authors allowed us a glimpse into their imaginations and their literary lives as they aim to entertain their readers while remaining true to their principles of caring about others and the planet we all share.

The next day, I also had the opportunity to talk about environmental themes and the reality of our extremely wasteful and destructive ways with Helen. What I love about her approach to these highly topical concerns is her can-do attitude. Helen does not make her readers despair, she empowers us and encourages to do things differently, with more care and compassion. A true inspiration. And she is so funny, too!

No wonder all her books were sold out within minutes after the talk. The booksellers at the festival, Rosemary and Carmen of Bargain Books George, did a stellar job at getting our books to Prince Albert, but even they could not predict how popular Helen’s little books of environmental wisdom would turn out to be.

Whenever I present at a festival myself or interview authors, I always try to attend other events as a reader. In the morning of the first day, Dawn and I went to listen to Joanne Jowell and Miché Solomon speak to Vanessa Botha about Miché’s remarkable story as told to Joanne in Zephany: Two Mothers, One Daughter. And in the evening, we listened to Helen, Annette Snyckers and Archie Swanson read their poetry. It was the perfect way to end the day. Beauty and calm descended as the poets treated us to a literary feast.

I also attended Jan van Tonder’s talk at the festival. He was interviewed by Pieter Hugo. I love listening to Afrikaans and this was my way of indulging in the language a little bit again. What made the occasion truly special were the accompanying memories. When I first visited André in Cape Town in May 2005, on the day after my arrival he drove me to Oudtshoorn to introduce me to his dear friends, Marina and Gerrit. I met Jan during the visit, too. Two years later, in 2007, we all gathered in Stilbaai and watched the Rugby World Cup final together. Jan reminded me of the occasion when we spoke after the talk and said: “When I saw you in André’s Springbok shirt earlier in the day, I thought it a good omen for the final.” Indeed, both times Jan and I were in the same place for the final, the Boks won. I think we should plan something for 2023 together!

I can’t wait until Jan’s latest novel is translated into English. It sounded like something I would love to read. I will never forget his Roepman / Stargazer.

There was time to relax and to celebrate. Prince Albert welcomed us all with open arms. The organisers of the festival deserve medals for all their fantastic work. Thank you to Linda Jaquet and the Leesfees team! Our hosts were kind in providing us with the most beautiful places to stay. The audiences were attentive and generous. I already promised myself that I will be there for the next Leesfees in whatever capacity: as publisher, writer, interviewer or reader. And next time, on the way there or back, Helen and I are planning a longer visit at Matjiesfontein. There was only time for lunch and the celebratory springbok burger on this trip.

When we visit again, Helen promised to play the piano in the bar of the Lord Milner Hotel! And we might have a book to launch…

 

Review: The Unfamous Five by Nedine Moonsamy

The-Unfamous-Five-310x480Friends Neha, Devon, Shejal, Janine and Kumari live in the Indian suburb of Lenasia and spend a lot of time together. It is the early 90s, just before the first democratic election in South Africa. The country is preparing for change when the teenagers witness a terrible crime on one of their outings in the township. Their sense of belonging and identity is shaken as they embark on the rough path to adulthood after this lethal incident. Alongside them, South Africa is also trying to come into its own. This is the premise of Nedine Moonsamy’s beautifully crafted debut novel, The Unfamous Five. Although clearly echoing Enid Blyton’s The Famous Five novel series, Moonsamy makes this story completely local and her own.

The Unfamous Five is narrated from the perspective of all five friends at different stages of their lives from June 1993 to April 2003. The individual stories are told in affecting vignettes that reveal the multi-facetted connections between the friends, their families and other people who come to share their lives with them as time progresses.

“As she lives through the moment she already knows that she will remember it for the rest of her life”, it is revealed about Janine at one point in the book, as the account continues: “She records it in her mind as one of those moments. Those moments when reality bursts open like a volcano and spits hot lava across one’s front lawn.” It is the perfect description of how the novel records the essential stages of the group’s journey as individual young adults and as a whole.

It took me a few pages to get into the intense rhythms of the narration, but once I did, I could not put The Unfamous Five down, curious of how these lives would develop and whether the relationships depicted would survive their many permutations and challenges. All five stories are compelling, but I was particularly moved by Janine’s.

Through these characters, Moonsamy brings the transition alive in a way that is truly tangible, never shying away from the most difficult aspect of the period, exposing the devastating consequences of racism, homophobia and intolerance of any kind: “This is how they choose to spend their time, undressing each other until they stand there, naked and raw, clinging together as they desperately search in one another for a new truth about themselves.” The observation is made during an argument about the past and the New South Africa. It is the private and the personal that becomes political here as in the best of fiction addressing these concerns through this specific place and time in history.

This is the adventure of life, he [Devon] thinks, travelling through each other’s lives, each other’s weeks.” Moonsamy offers us a generous insight into what the adventure of life entailed for the unfamous – but fascinating – five of her novel.

The Unfamous Five

Nedine Moonsamy

Modjaji Books, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 15 November 2019.

Review: Out of Darkness, Shining Light by Petina Gappah

Out of Darkness, Shining Light“Whoever heard of a group of people marching from place to place with a dead body?” It is precisely such a journey that is at the centre of Petina Gappah’s latest novel, Out of Darkness, Shining Light. Two decades in the making, the book tells the story of the sixty-nine men and women who decided to carry the body of Bwana Daudi – the Scottish physician and explorer David Livingstone – across the African continent after his death, so that his remains could be interred in his own country.

“In the grave we dug for him under the shade of a mvula tree, his heart, and all the essential parts of him, are at one with the soil of his travels. The grave of his bones proclaims that he was brought over land and sea by our faithful hands.”

The novel has two primary narrators: the expedition’s cook, the slave woman from Zanzibar called Halima, who is freed by Livingstone’s death, and the aspiring missionary from the Nassick school in India, also a former slave, Jacob Wainwright. Their voices complement each other perfectly in this richly textured chronicle of loyalty and betrayal, ambition and resilience, placing the emphasis on the lives of people neglected by history, the true protagonists of this particular tale.

Gappah’s approach is stunningly encapsulated in the retelling of the famous encounter between Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley, one of numerous highlights of this sumptuously imagined historical novel. It has been a long time since I have delighted in a book so much. Out of Darkness, Shining Light is Gappah’s third novel since the publication of her exquisite debut collection of short stories, An Elegy for Easterly, ten years ago. It takes you to the heart of the continent, illuminating it with the bright torch of African storytelling.

Out of Darkness, Shining Light

Petina Gappah

Faber & Faber, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 25 October 2019.

Review: Wise About Waste – 150+ Ways to Help the Planet by Helen Moffett

WiseAboutWasteThere is nothing to be done. We are coming too late to the party, allowing doom and gloom to persist. It’s easier to remain in a state of stupor than to take up the torch of an eco-warrior. Looking around, you will be forgiven for thinking that the war is already lost anyway. And there is no doubt about it: we are the bad guys on the wrong side of history. We are destroying our environments with ignorant dedication at a mind-boggling speed. The results are undeniable and crushing.

After her book on water conservation, 101 Water Wise Ways, published at the height of the water crisis when Day Zero was looming large in Cape Town, Helen Moffett turned to tackling the most pressing issues involved in waste reduction. She does not deny that the situation globally is precarious, to say the least, but once again Moffett approaches the challenge with a can-do attitude and a dose of healthy humour, no matter what the odds.

Wise About Waste: 150+ Ways to Help the Planet will make you feel empowered and arm you with numerous practical tips that don’t necessarily take a fortune and around-the-clock dedication to implement. Moffett shows how to make a significant difference – to the planet and, more selfishly, to us humans – with relative ease. It’s a no-brainer: “the healthier the environment, the healthier we are.” She also urges us to think bigger and strive for change on a large scale, but it is what she proposes we do in our everyday family lives that gave me most hope.

“Resistance is NOT futile”, Moffett writes and encourages us to embrace our “inner fish” and to “swim upstream”. Becoming “wise about waste” is not always easy, but it certainly feels more attainable since I have read this book.

Wise About Waste: 150+ Ways to Help the Planet

by Helen Moffett

Bookstorm, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 13 September 2019.

Review: Upturned Earth by Karen Jennings

Upturned Earth“You learn to like the taste of sand out here … It gets to a point where you don’t feel quite right without a grain or two in your mouth. After all, it’s what the miners eat, isn’t it?” With these words the new magistrate of a mining town in Namaqualand is welcomed by his predecessor. It is winter of 1886, and after an arduous journey, William Hull arrives in Springbokfontein to guard the rule of law in the desolate place. Hull is well-meaning but obtuse and naïve; it takes him a while to grasp that there is only one real authority in town, the Cape Copper Mining Company, and that his attempts at justice are also being treacherously undermined in his own home, under his very nose. The battle of wills that ensues has tragic consequences.

At the same time, Molefi Noki returns to the copper mines from his village in the Idutywa Reserve in the Transkei Territory, where he and his wife had just lost a baby after yet another difficult pregnancy and birth. Grieving and desperate, the Xhosa miner embarks on a search for his missing brother who had been sent to the notorious local jail for drunkenness and seems to have disappeared since then.

Tensions between the miners and the Company arise over working conditions and pay. After a tragedy claims many lives, the conflict escalates into outright horror. “It’s the way of the mines; you should know that well enough. How many old miners do you see walking around? … None. No miner sits by the fire in his old age with his grandchildren bouncing on his knees. It’s the same for all of us”, one of the mine workers reminds Noki.

Shattered by the Marikana Massacre of 16 August 2012, and inspired by historical sources about the Cape Copper Mining Company, Karen Jennings wrote Upturned Earth “as a comment on the history of commercial mining in South Africa – the exploitation, conditions and corruption that began in the 1850s and continue to the present,” as she states in her author’s notes. The novel is a sobering reminder of the roots of everything that has been going wrong in the mining industry for decades. Written from the perspectives of Hull and Noki, Upturned Earth throws a light into the darkest places of this history and shows that not much has changed, and there is so much to fight for.

Jennings is a novelist, short-story writer and a poet. Upturned Earth is her fifth book, showcasing her striking talent that is maturing with every new publication. Born in Cape Town in 1982, she currently lives in Brazil, but her creative consciousness is steeped in the African imaginary. Her latest novel is an incisive contribution to our understanding of what it means to endure a system that “no individual could ever hope to alter or redeem.”

Upturned Earth

by Karen Jennings

Holland Park Press, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 13 September 2019.

Review: Wilder Lives – Humans and Our Environment by Duncan Brown

WilderLivesNot all is well with the world. In moments of dark disillusionment, it is easy to give in to despair and just do nothing. But it is worthwhile to remember that if all of us, or at least most of us, institute even the tiniest of changes in our lives, we can make these lives better and we can make the world a better place, for ourselves and others.

Duncan Brown will be known to readers as the author of Are Trout South African?, which partly informs his latest book Wilder Lives: Humans and Our Environments. It is difficult for me to pinpoint why this book made me feel happy, but it did. Perhaps it was because Brown does not preach. He is a generous writer who shares his observations and research in a way that is empowering. The fact that his book made me feel better about my completely wild (or “neglected”, as many visitors seem to think) garden might be another reason.

Divided into ten highly accessible chapters, Wilder Lives focuses on ways we can “re-wild” our lives, whether through conservation, language, or in re-examining ethics. The concept of “rewilding” looks for definitions of “wild” that have “positive value (self-propagating, growing sustainably, self-reliant, independent, and so on)”. In this sense, rewilding champions a nourishing of the self-sustaining ecological process.

Brown also examines our misconceptions about “wildness” and what we often think are its opposites: culture, civilisation, or simply us, humans. The belief that wildness can only exist “where humans are absent” is still prevalent but, as Brown explains, it is rendered “questionable as a concept in which human influence is omnipresent”. What is definitely of essence is that we realise we are not as important as we want to believe. Humility might be the trait that could perhaps save us from ourselves. Brown makes it clear that rewilding is, in the words of George Monbiot, “not about abandoning civilization but enhancing it.”

Deeply aware of the “contradiction, ambiguity and paradox, especially in their entanglement in South Africa with colonial and apartheid histories”, Brown presents us with ideas about wildness and our role in it that are balanced and not intimidating. In the chapter on wildness and language, he shows what a difference just paying attention and being able to name and describe the environments we engage with – “a place literacy”, in Robert Macfarlane’s words – can help us live more rewarding lives. It reminded me of the joy I experience when watching and naming the birds visiting my ecologically uncontrolled garden.

We can all profit in the end, and in ways that we don’t necessarily immediately recognise as profitable. What is it that makes our modern lives so rough to process? Maybe a more conscious, re-evaluated way of existing within our environments can lead to simpler and much more fulfilling journeys. Wilder Lives assuredly offers one of “possibility, affirmation and excitement.”

Wilder Lives: Humans and Our Environments

by Duncan Brown

UKZN Press, 2019

Review first published in the Cape Times on 30 August 2019.